Honor and Debts

 
On this page

Debts

Learning

Morality

Honor

The kitsune's idea of honor is somewhat more.... fluid than the Rokugani. They don't understand some of the more rigid aspects of the Samurai code of honor, and they are downright baffled by others. For instance, the kitsune will cheerfully and unabashedly run away if fleeing suits them or if it is obvious that the fight is one that they cannot win.

Conversely, however, there are some aspects of honor wherein kitsune are very rigid. For example, the kitsune's concept of tribute to the Den Lord. The kitsune is under absolutely no obligation to pay tribute nor are they taxed directly certain amounts. They determine for themselves after serious, honest consideration what the appropriate tribute is and how often they should give it. It is very rare that a kitsune needs corrected in such matters.

When a kitsune does give their word to something, they will absolutely do whatever they have promised (unless there is a previous promise that keeps them from completing the second promise to its fullest degree). Their loyalty is absolute, and once they have decided to follow someone, they will do so until that person removes them or until the that person has presented them with a choice so severe that the kitsune cannot handle either option. For this reason, though, kitsune tend to devote themselves to only one being or ideal at a time. The kitsune who has a mate and has started a family will probably not devote themselves to follow another person because their family must hold a certain amount of their regard.

Debts

It is best to simply not be in debt to a kitsune, for they will cheerfully wring the unfortunate of every last ounce of repayment that they can.

On the flip side, however, a kitsune who is indebted to someone else will go to great lengths to honor that debt. Because of this, though, kitsune are very careful to avoid getting into debt to someone else. For example, Ginyue is rescued once from a hunter's trap by a rural peasant blacksmith and nursed to health. Upon finding the human had died later that same year, she returns every new moon for the next 15 years to do the blacksmithing work that the peasant would have done for his modest village and made effort to provide for the man's family. She also spends this time training the blacksmith's son in the arts of blacksmithing. While the father could do no more than the most basic of work, by the time the son reaches 20 he is a highly skilled smithy. Ginyue goes well above and beyond what might have been expected of her, because she felt in debt.

Learning

The life span of a kitsune is measured in hundreds of years, not mere decades. The kitsune, then, has a great deal of time in which to pursue any of their many curiosities. While they have a great deal of time, though, it can sometimes take a kitsune a proportionately large amount of time to learn a new skill. This is due for the most part to the kitsune's tendency towards a lack of focus. Most kitsune simply cannot sit still and work on a single skill for hours on end. They cannot sit still and meditate on a problem and they usually have a great deal of trouble working on something that is as much intuition and practice as anything else. They will quickly lose patience with something that they have to try over and over several times before they get the skill correct.

Some do, of course. Those kitsune who make their way into the ranks of the humans for the purposes of study must eventually learn how to focus and concentrate for long periods of time or find themselves strangled by their human teachers.

Their endearing and saving grace, however, is that they will do anything that their teachers tell them to. They might get annoyed at a chore that is embarrassing, or be upset at teasing or harsh words for their slowness, but as long as the chore is related to actually learning the skill or task that they want to learn, they will do it. This is not as entirely apparent when a person first begins teaching a kitsune, though the kitsune's determination to actually learn the skill will always impress. It is not until the kitsune and the teacher have developed a working relationship with at least a touch of trust or respect that the kitsune's willingness to do whatever they need to learn becomes apparent.

This opens the kitsune up to a certain amount of abuse. The kitsune will tolerate such abuse as long as they believe that what they are doing is for the sake of learning the skill that they were interested in. If a kitsune should ever find out that they are being taken advantage of, however, their wrath will be great and they won't particularly care if the meting out of that wrath hurts others as well. It is these kitsune who will encourage dry rot or bring in insects that devour homes or who will dry up entire stretches of rice fields.

Kitsune require twice the points to advance or gain a skill or ring level.

 

Morality

Much like the kitsune idea of honor is fluid, their idea of morality is as well. Kitsune flat out enjoy thieving, it is a past time that comes as easily and often as greeting another person good morning. They have no trouble telling a lie, and they will do so without batting an eye or turning an ear.

Similarly they have absolutely no trouble killing if the situation calls for it. A kitsune will almost never mourn the fact that they had to kill or harm another being. If killing is the most effective means to an end, they will do so. If maiming, frightening, or any other lesser pain is the best means to an end, they will do so.

They are notorious seducers. While a kitsune will pick a single mate with whom they have children, until they are mated they tend towards enjoying themselves as they sample. Kitsune do draw the line at rape, however, for that is a crime that goes farther than mere terror or expediency. Kitsune may have no problem making a woman or soldier think that they are laying with someone else, but they do not force the other person... they consider that not only cheating, but distasteful and crass. If one has to resort to force for sex, obviously they aren't good enough at it.

 

 
Back to top
Back to top
Back to top
Back to top
Back to top
Back to top
Back to top
Back to top

 

Kitsune/L5R main Contact me

Main Home